the Pipe and Tabor compendium

the Pipe and Tabor compendium

essays on the three-hole pipe

South and Central America

archeology to today

 

 

 

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"“our cavalcade entered the town ... and every house resounded with the noise of trumpets, tabors, and pipes. ..."
Before feasts they " select a number of Indians who are to be the dancers ... The music is a pipe and tabor,
and the most extraordinary of their motions some awkward capers; in short, the whole is little to the taste of an European. ...

then one of them plays on a pipe and tabor, whilst others dance, as they call it, though it is not more than moving confusedly
from one side to the other, without measure or order.”

Antonio de. Ulloa in 1806 wrote 'A voyage to South America ..' in Spanish:

 

Argentina

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playerpanpipes and drums in political demonstration

 

South America with dancers
South America religious procession
South America with solo male dancer

video Txistu from Banfield

end-blown flutekamacheña, end-blown flute

The geographical area where the kamacheña (flute) is built and used comprises northwestern Argentina and southern Bolivia

When performed together with the kamacheña, the caja (drum) is usually fastened by a loop of leather to the right wrist of the male musician, who holds the waqtana or guastána, the stick or mace, in the same hand.  Andean traditional gender taboos do not allow women to play aerophones (wind instruments).

The Andean traditional calendar lays down that each musical instrument can only be performed during a specific time of the year and for specific purposes (usually related to agriculture and other traditional practices).  The kamacheña is played during the awti pacha or "dry season" (comprising from Carnival to All Saints' Day). Hence, its sound will be heard at winter festivals, e.g. during the feast of San Roque (mid-August) and, of course, All Saints celebrations (early November) and Carnival (February and March).

 
Bolivia
player1992 Qhochipata Indians

Pincullo is also called pincollo, pinvollo, pinquillo, pincuillo opingollos and in Quichua aymará pinkiyllu, pinkillo

It adopts different sizes and diameters. It is used especially in carnival and in the past it was used in combat to produce a hellish noise and frighten the enemy.

In today’s Bolivian and Peruvian Andes, pinkullu or pinkillu duct flute performance is exclusively male, strongly associated with courtship and usually restricted to the rainy growing season between All Saints (November) and Carnival (February or March). The instrument’s sound is widely claimed to attract rain and to cause the crops to grow. 

 The name applies equally to the three-hole pipe, played with a drum by a single player, or to five-, six- or seven-hole duct flutes which are typically played in consort. 

player1992 Tambocusi Indians

player2014

playerin the fields

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Waka Pinquillo
the duct flute of Bolivia.
It is made of cane about 45 to 50 cm long and 2.5 cm in diameter, with two fingerholes and one thumbhole, and a square opening at the duct. Overblowing produces multiple harmonics.
 
player

Kunfur pinquillo
(condor flute) or
quri pinkilly (golden flute)
from Ayllu Macha, northern Bolivia. photog Henry Stobart

 
Chile
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Colombia
1925 - " Young Indians follow dancing to flute and tambour”
 
Costa Rica
pre-Colombian player 400-1500 pendant
for more pre-Colombian images
see here
 

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